The oak and the reed

Quercus exprobrabat harundini mobilitatem et quod ea ad quamvis exiguam auram tremeret. It fell among some Reeds, which it thus addressed: But the end is coming. We bow before them and so we do not break. But slim Reeds at his side, The fierce gale did outride, Since, by bending the burden was borne.

In democratic times, the conduct of the reed came to be seen as cowardly and self-serving and the fable began to be rewritten from this point of view.

Townsend version The Oak and The Reeds A very large oak was uprooted by the wind and thrown across a stream. When the wind blew, the great Oak stood proudly upright with its hundred arms uplifted to the sky.

The Tree and The Reed

Which are the stormes and tempestes of this life; With patience then, wee must the combat wage, And not with force resist their deadlie strife: Two groups from The oak and the reed have made use of the fable more recently.

Paulo post, procella furit et quercum, quae ei resisteret, radicitus evellit; harundo autem, quae cederet vento, locum servat. Although the fable with an oak has prevailed over the one with an olive, a group of 16th century fabulists preferred the latter version.

You stood stiff and stubborn till you could stand no longer. The Oak drifted across the stream, and lodged among some Reeds. You, in all your pride and strength, have so far resisted their blows. Moral Better to yield when it is folly to resist, than to resist stubbornly and be destroyed.

They are similar enough to be included on the same page. Thus Hadrianus Junius tells the fable in a four-line Latin poem and follows it with a lengthy commentary, part of which reads: But suffer still, and then wee shall, in fine, Our foes subdue, when they with shame shall pine.

When once again the oak falls in the storm, the reed jeeringly asks if he had not foreseen the outcome correctly. In the version by Samuel Croxallwhich was widely followed, the uprooted oak is floating downstream and enquires of a reed how it has survived the storm.

One of the first appeared among the seven published in by Bernard Gelval [34] which afterwards became part of the sung repertoire of the actor Yves Deniaud. The tree taunts the reed for its frailty and yielding to every wind but the reed does not answer back.

Obscurity often brings safety. This stems from the thinking behind another ancient emblem that appeared among the Emblesmes of Hadrianus Junius When Envie, Hate, Contempte, and Slaunder, rage: The wind redoubled in fury, and all at once the great tree fell, torn up by the roots, and lay among the pitying Reeds.

But the Reeds bowed low in the wind and sang a sad and mournful song. Placed before a version of "The oak and the reed" which is there told of a rowan[16] it pictures an oak whose branches are stripped by a gale and has the title "The disasters of princes are unlike those of ordinary folk".

It is just the same in the case of a just and balanced spirit, which cares not for invincible strength and defeats malice and other evils by patient endurance, and achieves great riches by the acquisition of undying glory - whereas boldness more often than not has its downfall.

From the earliest printed editions, the makers of woodcuts have taken pleasure in contrasting diagonals with the verticals and horizontals of the picture space, as well as the textures of the pliable reed and the sturdy tree trunk.The Oak and the Reed, By Jean de La Fontaine.

Cajolery and force have been two constant ways men have had of getting their point, or making their point successfully. Cajolery and force have been two constant ways men have had of getting their point, or making their point successfully.

And that was Aesop’s fable of the Oak and the Reed, retold in verse by Jeffrey's Taylor and it was read by me, Richard Scott, for mi-centre.com And Bertie says that if you have ever been for a walk in the park, the day after a great storm, you have probably seen some tall and strong trees that have been blown over by the wind.

strength and flexibility “A Giant Oak stood near a brook in which grew some slender Reeds. When the wind blew, the great Oak stood proudly upright with its hundred arms uplifted to the sky.

Aesop's Fable: The Oak and the Reeds

But the Reeds bowed low in the wind and sang a sad and mournful song. The Oak and the Reeds. A Giant Oak stood near a brook in which grew some slender Reeds. When the wind blew, the great Oak stood proudly upright with its hundred arms uplifted to the sky.

The Oak and the Reed

A Giant Oak stood near a brook in which grew some slender Reeds. When the wind blew, the great Oak stood proudly upright with its hundred arms uplifted to the sky. But the Reeds bowed low in the wind and sang a sad and mournful song. “You have reason to complain,” said the Oak.

The tree held strong; the Reed he bent. The wind redoubled and did not relent, Until finally it uprooted the poor Oak Whose head had been in the heavens And roots among the dead folk.

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The oak and the reed
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